FAQ

Izzy is the cat with the white/pink nose. Zoë is the cat with the black nose and black  heart-marking on her chest.

They were both born on July 12, 2015. Izzy was born first out of all her siblings.

Yes, Izzy and Zoë are siblings from the same  litter. They have three other siblings, but Izzy and Zoë were the only two tuxedo (black&white) kitties.

Izzy and Zoë are both female.

They are of mixed breed. Their mother is a blue British Shorthair  and their father is a tuxedo European Shorthair.

Zoë is the only kitten of her litter who did not have short hair, but rather medium hair.  Her fur is about twice as long as Izzy’s. Before Izzy and Zoë got their final names, Zoë was referred to as ‘the fluffy one’ to keep them apart. This nickname stuck. However, she also goes by ‘Queen of Hearts’, due to the heart-shaped marking on her chest.

Izzy and Zoë live in the Netherlands.

Zoë’s chest was not in any of the adoption photos. Originally we were only going to adopt one kitten and had chosen Izzy. When we came to pick up Izzy, we saw the heart-marking on her sister. Remarkably, no one had noticed this before. When said out loud, the others present still didn’t see it. She was very tiny and moving all the time. Zoë’s heart-marking was not the reason we adopted her – we did so because she was adorable and we couldn’t bear to separate her from her clearly bonded sister Izzy. It wasn’t until we had taken her home, she sat still for a second, and we took some pictures of her to send to  friends and family, that it became apparent just how perfect this heart-patch was.

Yes, Zoë’s heart-marking is 100% real. She has had it since she was a kitten. There is plenty of moving footage of her heart-marking on our Instagram, in videos as well as in the Instagram Stories we upload daily.

This is what her heart looks like when she walks.

Or when she winks at you. 😉

Yes, they are real.

If you are referring to their often big pupils, this is because I take these photos at night time. As you know, anyone’s pupils dilate as it gets darker. It’s as simple as that: I mostly shoot when it gets dark, because I love the big pupils. I also like to photograph their facial expressions when they are playing at night time, which makes for even bigger pupils.
Here you can see Izzy’s big pupils in action:

 

And here you can see Zoë’s:

 

If you are referring to their eye colour; variations in their eye colour are caused by different lighting situations. Just take a look at their eyes in this video below and see how the colour changes depending on how the light hits their eyes (especially Izzy’s, who moves more):

 

They are truly inseparable.

Izzy is fearless, adventurous, and extremely in-your-face cuddly. I often wake up with her sleeping on top of me. She loves to jump really high to catch things. Jumping at it is the most interesting part to her – when she has caught it, she lets go so she can jump again. Her favourite thing to steal is hairbands of any  kind. She loves playing in the yard and her favourite food is chicken.

Zoë is cautious, yet way more curious and mischievous. She regularly has a case of what we call ‘the crazies’, which involves her doing random side-jumps against walls and furniture, jumping over Izzy and bitch-slapping unfortunate plants. She is obsessed with stealing anything plastic and is also very affectionate, but in a more subtle way than Izzy. She loves to chase things on the floor but can also jump really high. Catching the prize is her ultimate goal – once she has it she won’t let go. Zoë is picky when it comes to food and doesn’t like most fish except for tuna. Her favourite is chicken. She is allergic to anything containing dairy (even lactose-free).

I shoot my photos in raw and process my pictures on my PC in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop.  I never use any Instagram filters or edits.

I use Adobe Photoshop (PC version) to add my watermark. I adjust the size, curve and placement per photo so it can’t be cropped out yet is not visually distracting.

Before I got Photoshop, I used free software GIMP to do this.

I use a Canon EOS 750d body with various lenses, mostly a 50mm f1.8 (all recent pictures). Some photos are shot with a 18 – 55 mm STM IS.

My videos are shot with a Samsung Galaxy S7 Edge, my Canon EOS 750d or a GoPro Hero 5. All stories are shot with my phone.

If they ever do a public appearance, it will be announced on on their Instagram. It’s not possible to meet them in their home, due to privacy reasons.

Unfortunately, we have seriously been asked this multiple times. Izzy and Zoë are part of our family. Asking us to sell either of them, is as if you are asking to buy our child. The answer is no, obviously.

For information about collaborations, email to meow@izzyandthefluff.com or colleen@petsonq.com.

If you want to sublicense my high resolution, unwatermarked photos or videos please email directly to dean.murray@cover-images.com.

If you want to ask permission to use my Instagram content, please email me at meow@izzyandthefluff.com.

 

The general idea for the design of the logo is my own, but it was perfectly executed by Tessa De Langen.

Matthew Clowney was also of great help.

How to report stolen content on Instagram

Did someone post your photo or video without your permission and without giving credit to your account? Are they ignoring your questions to please give you credit? Or do you just want it gone? You can have Instagram remove this content for you, very easily.

You own the copyright to any photo or video you take and post on Instagram. No one is allowed to repost this content without your permission. Using a specific #hashtag to get your photo featured, is often considered as an equivalent to giving consent. Most people don’t mind if their content is being reposted without permission, as long as proper credit is given.
But if no credit is given, or if you simply do mind, you can easily have the photo or video taken down by Instagram by filing a DCMA report.

This is the link to file a DCMA report on Instagram.

It is important to know that the person you are reporting will receive any personal information you provide in this report. Don’t let this scare you off – you don’t have to complete all the fields they are asking for. The minimum amount of information required for the report to be valid, is your name and an email address. You do not have to provide more information than this. You do not have to give them your home address or phone number.

Also note that you can only report content that violates your own copyright.

Step by step guide to report stolen content

  1. Click the DCMA link.
  2. Click the option saying you found content that violates your copyright.
  3. Click the next pop up to confirm you want to continue with your copyright report.
  4. Click to add your contact information. As noted above, you only have to provide your name and any email address. Use your real name – not your Instagram account name. You can use your cat account’s email address.
  5. Confirm your email address.
  6. Select your country of residence.
  7. Click on the content you want to report and specify what kind of content it is.
  8. Add the direct link to the content you are reporting. If the account has blocked you, try to get the link via another Instagram account they have not blocked or ask someone else to get you the link.
  9. Select why you are reporting this content.
  10. Click to supply your original work and select the type of content this is.
  11. Add the direct link to the post on your own instagram account.
  12. Optional: you can add attachments that prove you own the copyrights to this content.
  13. Confirm you have the copyright to this content.
  14. Confirm that you agree.
  15. Add your electronic signature (just type your name).
  16. Submit. And you’re done!
  17. Instagram will send you an email confirming your report.
  18. Instagram will send you an email once they have removed or disabled access to the content. This is usually within 48 hours.

This is what a filled out DCMA form would look like.

What if…

  • …I want to report a profile picture?

Follow the steps above, except at step 8 you link to the general profile of the person who is using your picture as profile picture. Then in the same field where you put the link, state very clearly that you are NOT reporting the whole account and that you are only reporting the PROFILE PICTURE.

  • …Instagram does not believe I have the copyright to this content?

It has happened to me several times before that for various reasons, Instagram could not instantly verify I had the copyright to the content I was reporting. For example when I had deleted the content from my own profile, or because the thief had an early unwatermarked version that I deleted from my profile and that I had replaced for a watermarked version on my account.
Do not despair. I have never not been able to get content taken down. If Instagram does not take down your stolen content right away, simply reply to their email with additional proof that it is your copyright.
For example, provide the full resolution photo that is larger in size/crop than what can be found anywhere on the internet, take a photo of your cat in the exact same spot and include a physical note saying your cat belongs to [your name/ig account name], if there are interviews by reputable sources that confirm you are the owner of this cat (account) then link to that, etc. Be creative – if you have the copyright then there are multiple ways to prove it besides providing a link to an instagram post.

General Tips

  • This does not only apply to Instagram. If you find your content on any other (social media) platform such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Reddit, you name it: find their DCMA form and fill it out. They all basically work the same way.
  • It really helps if you watermark your photos. You can do so in a manner that is not visually distracting. The benefits of this are that people can easily identify you as the owner of the photo which means that:
    1) Even if credit is not given, they can still find you if they like what they see.
    2) People can notify you if they see your content being stolen.
    For me, 100% of copyright reports I file are based on someone notifying me of the theft. Often these come from people I do not know, and I am very grateful to them.
    3) Instagram can very easily determine that it is your content and if you file a report, the stolen content will be taken down very fast.
  • If you have a lot of copyright reports to deal with, you can make this more manageable by creating a collection called ‘report’ in your Instagram collections. Simply save all the stolen content to this collection when you see it, and report them when you have time.
  • Once you’ve found stolent content of yours, it’s very likely that this account does not credit any other content they post either. It would really help if you scan through the feed to see if you can identify the content of others, and if so, notify them. If the person you notified doesn’t know how to report, send them the link to this page (it works in Instagram DMs). This is the only way to put a stop to accounts that repeatedly violate copyright. If they get reported for copyright violations by many individuals, eventually their account will be taken down.